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Webinars and Events

We are organising a series of webinars in autumn/winter 2020/21 for researchers, third sector organisations, policymakers and practitioners to discuss and debate contemporary issues about the nature, origins and impacts of inequality. The Understanding Inequalities (UI) research project is taking a multi-disciplinary approach to understanding the direct and indirect causes and consequences of inequality, how it manifests in different ways across different social groups and a range of spatial levels. We invite anyone working in the field of inequalities to join our webinars.

Speakers include Professor Mike Savage, Professor Ingrid Schoon and Professor Patrick Sharkey, as well as the UI Director Professor Susan McVie and Co-Directors Professor Jon Bannister, Professor Cristina Iannelli, Professor Gwilym Pryce and Professor Emer Smyth.

Speakers biographies

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Webinar series

How does politics shape inequalities?

This event has been postponed until further notice. How does politics shape inequalities? Evidence from Longitudinal and Spatial Data Sets: Understanding the Inequitable Legacy of Thatcherism. This webinar presents findings from a University of Derby project which has tried to explore and understand the long-term effects on crime and contact with the criminal justice system resulting from the changes in the economy and social policies unleashed by the 1980s New Right in Britain – often referred to as ‘Thatcherism’.

When: 
Thursday, January 28, 2021 - 15:00

Time zone:

Date: 
TBC

Unravelling the interwoven dimensions of geographic inequalities

What are the mechanisms behind spatial inequality? This webinar includes presentations from Professor Pat Sharkey (Princeton University), who will explore how the link between geography and inequality is growing in the US, and Co-Director of the UI project Professor Gwilym Pryce (University of Sheffield), who will propose a new conceptual framework for understanding spatial inequality

When: 
Wednesday, February 10, 2021 - 15:00 to 16:30

Time zone: